Found in former foundry in the 11th arrondissement of the French capital, Paris, the Atelier des Lumière is an art museum like no other. The space showcases early 20th-century paintings from the likes of Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele; but instead of being framed, every piece of fine art is projected across the gallery and is accompanied by a soundtrack.

This Digital Fine Art Museum in Paris Is Extraordinary

The Atelier des Lumière is a digital museum dedicated to fine art in Paris. It opened in April this year and features artworks projected onto 10-metre-high walls across a 3,300 square metre gallery space. It was commissioned to cater for the impact technology has had on the way people experience art, with the museum hoping to make fine art more accessible.

It’s ran by Culturespaces, a private operator of museums and monuments. According to president, Bruno Monnier; “Practices are evolving and the cultural offering must be in step with them. The marriage of art and digital technology is, in my opinion, the future of the dissemination of art among future generations.”

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The digital fine art museum has three main exhibition rooms. Every artwork is accompanied by a ‘motion design’, as well as a sound system with 50 speakers which plays a soundtrack by classical musicians such as Wagner, Chopin and Beethoven, amongst others.

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Currently, there are two rooms dedicated to Austrian painter Gustav Klimt and a century of Viennese painting, including works by Egon Schiele and Hundertwasser. One of the smaller rooms in the museum is reserved for emerging artists and features AI and digital installations.

The Atelier des Lumières museum is open daily from 10am and is located at 38 Rue Saint-Maur, 75011 Paris, France. Head over to the Atelier des Lumières Website for more details.

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At the start of the year, an exhibition in Japan called ‘Colour of Time’ used 120,000 paper number cut-outs to create a rainbow installation to visualise the passing of time.

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