Cello may not be a household name in the UK quite yet, but the Durham-based TV company has actually been around for some time now. Specialising in low-cost sets, Cello’s Platinum range marks a move into the 4K market, so we tested out their 55-inch Platinum 4K HD LED TV to see how it fared against the competition.

Cello Platinum 4K HD LED TV Review - ★★★

Design

The 55-inch model we tested sits between a 50-inch and mammoth 65-inch model. From the off, the first thing you’ll notice is that despite Cello’s undoubted ‘value’ ethos, this is a solid TV build which is pleasant to look at thanks to its clean silver frame and thin bezel. At 88mm deep, the Cello Platinum isn’t the thinnest TV on the market but it’s also far from being the chunkiest.

The six-driver, integrated soundbar is where Cello have tried to distinguish themselves from the market, and while we’re generally wary of built-in speakers, they actually look the part. The only issue in the Platinum’s look is the pedestal feet which give the the TV a deep footprint and perhaps limit options for sitting on a small table. We should also say you’ll need at least two people to connect them to the bottom of TV given its size.

At the back, you’ll find connections for three 4K-capable HDMIs and three 2.0 USB ports, as well as an optical digital audio output and micro SD card reader. The tuner is standard Freeview fare, albeit in HD.

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Features

Once you’ve got everything ready to go, you’ll notice the set-up process is an early version of the Android TV OS seen on screens from Sony and Philips. If we’re completely honest, it’s a little basic and very dated. While you can access the likes of BBC iPlayer, Netflix and Sky Go, none are pre-downloaded for you and you will have to login to a Google account to get there. We’d recommend saving yourself the trouble and investing in an Amazon Fire stick (or similar) and streaming through a games console or Blu-ray player.

The user interface is also fairly simplistic. Clearly trying to attract the less tech savvy consumer, there are only basic picture presets too – Standard, Dynamic, Theatre and Personal. The remote is functional but scrolling did seem to take an eternity.

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Performance

So how did it perform? Well… well! Images are relatively sharp and textured, while we found colour accuracy and contrast decent enough without blowing us away. We were impressed when watching 4K discs too and when tested a PS4, the input lag was extremely quick.

The only thing we would say about the display is it’s not the brightest, meaning it might not be the best TV in really bright rooms or scenes with a super dark setting. We should also mention that Cello’s Platinum range doesn’t support HDR. While it’s not surprising and HDR content isn’t the most widely available anyway, it is something worth making a mental note of.

One of the most surprising elements of the Cello Platinum was the integrated soundbar. Given it’s built-in, there’s no set-up and it packs a punch far greater than its weight. While it obviously can’t compete with high-end, detached soundbars and speaker systems, it’s more than passable and investing in an alternative certainly isn’t a necessity.

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Verdict

Overall, the Cello Platinum 4K HD LED TV is certainly good value. Prices for a 4K TV start at £489.99, while standard HD TVs begin at £229.99 – you really can’t argue with those prices, and knowing they were made up the road will certainly attract customers. The soundbar is a superb addition and its low input lag makes it ideal for gamers. Just don’t even bother with the Android set-up…

Our Rating: ★★★
Where to Buy: TV-Village.net

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