We all know that plastic waste is a big issue. But while we’re recycling more than ever, it’s fair to say we should be doing more, with packaging one of the main areas of focus in recent years. Step forward the Ooho! edible water bottle which is on a mission to rid the planet of plastic water bottles!

Ooho! Edible Water Bubbles Want to Replace Plastic Bottles

Americans alone throw away around 35 billion plastic bottles per year. Which is why Skipping Rocks Lab have masterminded the Ooho!, a water bubble which offer the convenience of plastic bottles while limiting the environmental impact.

Ooho! is actually a fairly simple idea. Drinking water is encircled within an edible membrane made from a natural seaweed extract. That means its completely edible, and if you don’t feel like eating it, the flexible, bubble-like packaging biodegrades in just 4-6 weeks, just like a piece of fruit.

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London-based sustainable packaging start-up, Skipping Rocks Lab, have begun piloting their water bubbles at major sporting events in 2018 and say the bubbles can be produced for a lower cost than plastic bottles. They also suggest that the membrane can be flavoured and coloured, and can also be used for other liquids such as soft drinks, spirits and cosmetics.

With a huge 750,000 bottles of water being handed out at the marathon alone, it’s easy to see what sort of an impact the biodegradable bubble could have on plastic waste if mass-produced. Obviously the main issue would be how the Ooho! is sold. What will the package be made from? Is the membrane strong enough to transport? And how many bubbles are equivalent to a 500ml plastic bottle of liquid?

There are still many questions that need to be answered before we declare the Ooho! water bubble as the future. But it’s certainly a step in the right direction! Head over to the Skipping Rocks Lab Website for more info.

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A major initiative aiming to rid the oceans of its discarded plastic by 2050, ‘The Ocean Cleanup’ is set to begin work within the next 12 months on ridding the world’s largest ocean garbage patch in the Pacific of its rubbish.

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